relationship marketing Archives | Page 5 of 7 | WebPT

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Living and Breathing Company Culture on Social

When it comes to company culture, there may be no better way to see what a brand is all about than to check out its social media sites. Sure, establishing a company’s core values is (for the most part) an internal initiative, but as Brooke pointed out in a post earlier this month, your company culture is essentially the personality of your brand. And whether you intend to or not, your personality will shine through in all your interactions—internal and external—especially when it comes to social.

And because—as this BrassTacs Thinking blog post stresses—your values as a company are demonstrated—and judged—through the people you entrust to embody them, it is especially important to choose the right person to speak on your and on your brand’s behalf.

So, whether you are aspiring to land your dream social media job, are already tasked with engaging patients and colleagues while maintaining your brand’s voice, or are a clinic owner setting the tone and strategy for your company’s social media initiatives, you may want to consider the following few tips:

The Candidate

Delete your profiles

I don’t mean to sound alarmist, but if you are in the job market, I recommend deleting all your social profiles, erasing your hard drive, and ditching any mobile devices you have. A bit much? Okay, fair enough. At the very least, you should conduct a seriously thorough audit of your social media profiles and ditch any pics or updates that might offend a potential employer. You do know that your potential employer is going to check out your tweets, right? It’s true.

Picture the future

Do you aspire to work for a specific clinic or know the type of employer you’d like to work for? You can take steps today to position yourself for your dream job in the future. Make it a point to exhibit the types of qualities and online behaviors that align with your dream company’s core values.

The Voice

Don’t be a jerk

Whether you are a seasoned pro or a new intern charged with running your company’s Twitter account, you are now your brand’s official spokesperson. No one likes snarky remarks, inside jokes, or incoherent ramblings, so always play nice. And remember, people are absolutely judging your company’s brand based on the content you post, how responsive or nonresponsive you are to comments and questions, and your overall tone and presentation.

Don’t assume everyone shares your sense of humor

Having a well developed and lively company culture is great! However, culture tends to be very specific to each company that embraces it, so it isn’t a given that your social followers will share your enthusiasm for something so distinctly yours. So while your best bet is to simply be yourself, you also should be approachable, engaging, and fun—and keep it light on the inside jokes.

The Big Wig

Set the vision

Congratulations! You’ve taken the time to clearly define and document your company’s core values, and you’ve succeeded in having staff embrace your company culture. You might even consider your company culture as a competitive advantage or a special something that sets you apart from the rest. Now it’s important to define your voice and tone—and to stick to it.

Hire the right person

Earlier this month, Charlotte talked about the importance of hiring for cultural fit, and this is especially important when filling such a visible, public-facing position. “Hiring for cultural fit means hiring people based more so on their  ‘below the surface’ qualities rather than their technical abilities. Why? Because you can’t train people to genuinely possess the same values that you and your business do.”

No matter your role, your best social media strategy is to be genuine and stay true to who you are. And don’t forget, people won’t judge you for who you say you are. They’ll judge you for who you actually are, the type of content you share with your followers, and the way you interact with your audience.

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Marketing for Cash-Based Practices

People often ask me how I market my cash-based practice. They’re under the impression that my marketing strategy must be completely different from that of a traditional, insurance-based clinic. This couldn’t be further from the truth. In my opinion, every physical therapy practice should market based on the assumption that patients will vote with their dollars.

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Use Promotional Products to Grow your Business and Boost Referrals

Rehab therapists should continually market their services to stay top-of-mind with current and potential customers as well as referring physicians. One way to do so is through promotional marketing. As the owner of a company that provides imprinted products and branded merchandise and apparel (with many customers who are service providers or work in medical facilities), I’ve seen the value of promotional marketing materials first-hand.

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Transform 2013: It Takes a Circus

This week was the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation’s annual conference, Transform, and in the spirit of rethinking typical seminars, the Center live-streamed the conference—for free. While I would’ve loved to fly to Rochester, Minnesota, to attend the event in person, I must say that viewing the presentations from the comfort of my home and interacting with attendees and participants on Twitter was

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How to Create a Marketing Plan for Your Practice

As a clinic owner, director, or manager, you know that marketing―both to consumers and referrers―is crucial to your business’s success. And as with any new endeavor, it’s good to have a plan. As Joanna L. Krotz at Microsoft Business explains, “a marketing plan gives you a roadmap that can drive action and point the way.” Beyond that, a marketing plan can help:

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Five Best Practices for Referral Marketing

This month, we’re talking a lot about marketing rehab therapy to consumers. And while that’s an important piece of the marketing puzzle—especially in a world dominated by search engines and social media—we’d be remiss to skip over another key method of generating more business for your practice: referral marketing. To significantly boost the number of referrals you receive, you’ve got to be proactive. So, here’s a rundown of some referral marketing best practices to help drive more patients through your front door.

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Four Metrics Critical to Your Blog

So you’ve started blogging, and that’s fantastic. It’s a great way to get your message out to the masses—whether it be how fantastic your services are, the latest in industry developments, or preferably, a well-balanced mix of both.

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Founder Letter: Marketing to the Consumer

When it comes to marketing your rehab therapy practice, the old school of thought is that to get more patients, you’ve got to get more referrals—and that means appealing only to physicians. Well, as the saying goes, “Out with the old, and in with the new!”

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Two Quick Tips for Facebook Success

Facebook. If you’re like me, you’ve deactivated your account more than once, only to return to the one place where everyone seems to be and where everything seems to happen. I checked out some of the most recent Facebook stats today, and the numbers are truly staggering—699 million daily active users,

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What Email Marketing Service is Right for Your Practice?

Picking the right email marketing service is a bit like buying a car. Some are going to look great on the outside, but pop the hood and you’ll find a mess. And sometimes going with the older model is the smart decision, instead of getting that brand new, foreign sports car.

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About Engagement on Social Media

You don’t get engagement by simply blasting an open-ended question across all your social channels or posting it in dozens of online forums and LinkedIn groups.

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5 Tips for Creating an Inviting Reception Area in Your Clinic

Your mother always told you not to judge a book by its cover, but in the world of small business, first impressions are crucial. Regardless of the type of practice you own, a patient’s opinion of your business begins the moment he or she walks through the front door. (For tips on getting more patients through the door in the first place, be sure to download our free marketing e-book.) The more welcoming the space, the better your chances of building a positive client experience right from the get-go. Here are five tips for creating an inviting reception area in your small business:

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