• The Complete PT Billing FAQ Image

    articleMay 24, 2016 | 25 min. read

    The Complete PT Billing FAQ

    Over the years, WebPT has a hosted a slew of billing webinars and published dozens of billing-related blog posts. And in that time, we’ve received our fair share of tricky questions. Now, in an effort to satisfy your curiosity, we’ve compiled all of our most common brain-busters into one epic FAQ. Don’t see your question? Ask it in the comments below. (And be sure to check out this separate PT billing FAQ we recently put together.) Questions …

  • Do You Know Your PT Billing Blunders? [Quiz] Image

    articleMay 17, 2016 | 1 min. read

    Do You Know Your PT Billing Blunders? [Quiz]

    Billing for physical therapy services is tricky, time-consuming, and nerve-racking. After all, there are so many rules you have to follow, and it seems like those rules are constantly changing. That makes mistakes tough to avoid. In many cases, you might not even know you’re making mistakes. And while an occasional billing error probably isn’t a huge deal, if you’re unknowingly flubbing up left and right, you could end up in hot water. And if you’re fudging …

  • Do You Know Your Modifiers? [Quiz] Image

    articleJul 29, 2015 | 1 min. read

    Do You Know Your Modifiers? [Quiz]

    It’s a mad, mad, mad, mad Medicare world, and unfortunately, just about every regulation requires a modifier. If you apply the wrong modifier—or forget one entirely—then your clinic suffers decreased payments or flat-out denials. Even worse, if you amass enough modifier mistakes, you make your practice vulnerable to an audit. Worried you’re miserable at modifiers or want confirmation that you’re actually a modifier master? Take our 10-question quiz below to test your modifier know-how.    

  • Technical Diligence: The Key to Stopping Claim Denials Dead in their Tracks Image

    articleJul 9, 2015 | 5 min. read

    Technical Diligence: The Key to Stopping Claim Denials Dead in their Tracks

    Hello, readers. Over the past several weeks, I’ve enjoyed answering a number of your questions regarding billing for PT services, so I’m excited to address the topic right here on the WebPT Blog. On June 19, 2015, the Office of the Inspector General (OIG) released a report involving an outpatient private practice physical therapy provider. In case you weren’t aware, the OIG—which is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)—is basically the CMS …

  • Common Questions from our Modifier Open Forum Image

    articleJul 7, 2014 | 10 min. read

    Common Questions from our Modifier Open Forum

    Should I have my patients sign an advance beneficiary notice of noncoverage (ABN) just in case Medicare doesn’t pay? No, by having your patient sign an ABN, you are acknowledging that you do not believe that the services you are providing are either medically necessary or covered by Medicare. If you have an ABN on file, you should include a modifier GA or GX modifier on your claim so Medicare knows to deny the claim and assign …

  • Act Now: The Therapy Cap Exceptions Process Expires March 31 Image

    articleMar 13, 2014 | 5 min. read

    Act Now: The Therapy Cap Exceptions Process Expires March 31

    For years, rehab therapists have had a love-hate relationship with Medicare’s therapy cap exceptions process. On the one hand, therapists often see it as a barrier to providing patients with the care they need; on the other, it’s the only means for therapists to continue treatment after a Medicare patient has exhausted his or her annual payment allotment for therapy services (a.k.a.  the therapy cap ). Reform of the cap has been a long time coming, and …

  • The Great Medically Necessary Discussion and How to Use ABNs Image

    articleMar 12, 2014 | 6 min. read

    The Great Medically Necessary Discussion and How to Use ABNs

    For many physical therapists, the phrase “medically necessary” sounds worse than nails on a chalkboard. On the one hand, it’s vague, subjective, and open to infinite interpretation. And on the other, it’s often the determining factor in whether payers—perhaps most notably, Medicare—will provide reimbursement for rehab therapy services. A Bit of History The history of the “medically necessary” reimbursement requirement stretches all the way back to the 1960s. As E. Haavi Morreim explains in  this article , it was …

  • articleNov 19, 2013 | 4 min. read

    Therapy Cap Recap

    If you’re a rehab therapist who treats Medicare patients, you’ve got a bevy of rules and regulations to follow and knowing all of them inside and out is a tall order, to say the least. If decoding government legalese isn’t really your thing, don’t worry—we’ve dedicated this entire month to serving up a smorgasbord of digestible, easy-to-understand guides on the important Medicare policies that apply to you. On today’s menu: the therapy cap. As part of the …

  • articleAug 28, 2013 | 7 min. read

    No Workarounds: Following the Rules of the Therapy Cap and the Importance of Solid Documentation

    If you’re like most rehab therapists, finding a letter from Medicare in your mailbox is enough to make your brow sweat and your heart skip a beat. With all of the regulations we have to follow—and the potential penalties associated with noncompliance—it’s no surprise that we have grown to fear Medicare. We’re afraid of doing something wrong. Or in some cases, we’re afraid of not getting paid. Thus, rather than defend our decisions, our expertise, and our …

  • articleMar 11, 2013 | 17 min. read

    February Medicare Webinar Q&A

    Last month’s webinar on Medicare was our most highly attended webinar to date. And that’s really not surprising, because wherever Medicare goes, questions follow. But unfortunately, we couldn’t get to them all live. So we thought we’d put together a blog post will all the great questions you asked and our answers. That way, you can access it wherever, whenever you want. Ready to jump in? Here’s your Medicare Q&A.    (P.S. Are you a first timer …

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