how-to Archives | WebPT

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Finding and Marketing Your OT Niche

The second rule in marketing any professional service is to know your audience; the first is know yourself, but as an occupational therapist, you have this part covered—for the most part.

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Common Questions from our Art of Discovering and Selling Value Webinar

Earlier this week, WebPT President Heidi Jannenga, PT, DPT, ATC/L, and guest host Tannus Quatre, PT, MBA, hosted a webinar designed to help physical therapists learn the art of discovering—and selling—their value. While PTs have historically shied away from sales, in today’s evolving healthcare ecosystem, it’s absolutely imperative that all providers—and especially specialists such as rehab therapists—excel at positioning the benefits of their services in such a way that resonates with patients, payers, and referral sources.

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Billin’ for Fill-ins: How to Bill for Temps and Travel PTs

Whether you need someone to cover your patient appointments while you’re out of town for the holidays, or you could use an extra pair of hands to help with the seasonal rush, you may be searching for a temp or travel PT. Of course, you’ll want to hire the very best person for the job—but you’ll also want to ensure they’re fully credentialed so you can properly bill and collect payment for their services.

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D’Oh! 3 Major Physical Therapy Marketing Fails

Homer Simpson introduced the catchphrase “d’oh!” on the long-running cartoon sitcom, The Simpsons, in 1989. It’s arguably one of the most recognizable catchphrases in American pop culture. So much so, in fact, that the Oxford Dictionary of English added the word in 2001. Defined as an informal exclamation “used to comment on a foolish or stupid action, especially one’s own,” “d’oh” is the most fitting—and safe for work—reaction to committing a major fail.

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They’re Just Not that Into You: Why Patients Churn (and How to Stop Them)

I don’t know about you, but I have a hard time with endings—even the end of a good book can leave me feeling melancholy for a few days while I process the fact that my newfound friends are continuing to live their fictional lives without me. While you may not experience pangs of loss over a well-developed character, I’d lay a wager that you feel the pain when a patient bails on you before his or her treatment plan is complete.

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