Men Less Likely to Get Osteoporosis Screenings

A new study has revealed that men are less likely than women to undergo screenings for osteoporosis, leaving millions of American men at-risk and untested. Of the more than 10 million Americans who have osteoporosis, up to 2 million of those are men. Moreover, men make up 8 to 13 million of the 43 million Americans who have low bone density, which often is a precursor to osteoporosis. During the study, most women participants said they would accept a free screening. Yet, despite the chilling statistics, only 25% of men agreed—even though men with this disease usually suffer more severe health consequences (including higher mortality rates) than women afflicted with the same condition. To find out more about this study—and learn why everyone needs to be screened for osteoporosis—go here.

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AMA Official Supports Bill to Block ICD-10 Implementation

The American Medical Association (AMA) recently announced its support of HR 2126, a bill that would prohibit the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) from proceeding with the October 1, 2015, transition to ICD-10. While medical professionals have had ample tools and time to prep for the transition, the AMA's executive vice president and CEO James Madara strongly supports the bill, stating that “timing of the ICD-10 transition could not be worse.” Madara says the healthcare industry should wait for ICD-11 in order to “get it done properly." Read more about this new bill and how it could impact the ICD-10 switch here.


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  • This Week in PT News, July 18 Image

    articleJul 18, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, July 18

    CMS Releases Proposed 2015 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Earlier this week, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released the proposed Medicare physician fee schedule for 2015. You can read highlights of the proposed rule and access a link to view the full version here . CMS will accept public comments on the rule until September 2, 2014, and the organization is expected to release the final fee schedule on or before November 1, 2014. ACL …

  • This Week in PT News, August 8 Image

    articleAug 8, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, August 8

    UnitedHealthcare Delays Requirement for Functional Limitation Reporting UnitedHealthcare announced on Monday that it is delaying its plan to implement functional limitation reporting (FLR) for physical therapy. In May, UnitedHealthcare announced that it would require FLR starting in August 2014. Since announcing the delay, the carrier has not released a new implementation date. Read more about the delay here . Physical Therapy and Corticosteroid Injections Offer Equal Relief from Shoulder Pain According to an article published in the …

  • This Week in PT News, May 2 Image

    articleMay 1, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, May 2

    CMS Hints at ICD-10 Transition Date Last night, during the release of 2015 IPPS Proposed Rule , CMS referenced October 1, 2015, as the new implementation date for ICD-10. In fact, according to the AAPC , CMS referenced that date three separate times within the proposed rule. Not prepared for the transition? Well, we have you covered. You can reference our previous blog posts about ICD-10 here or you can head over to our ICD-10 blog . …

  • This Week in PT News, April 4 Image

    articleApr 4, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, April 4

    ICD-10 Delayed On Monday, the Senate approved HR 4302, which extends the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) fix for another year and delays mandatory ICD-10 implementation until 2015. Learn more about this legislation and how it will affect your practice here . Muscle Mass Valuable in Older Adults A new study out of UCLA shows that the more muscle mass older adults have, the less likely they are to die prematurely. This article explains why muscle mass might …

  • This Week in PT News, June 12 Image

    articleJun 12, 2015 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, June 12

    New Study Reveals Why Some Indigenous Cultures Don’t Experience Back Pain According to NPR, California acupuncturist Esther Gokhale recently conducted an investigation into the factors that might explain why some indigenous cultures don’t experience low back pain. Like 75% of Americans, Gokhale has experienced back pain, and she wasn’t convinced Western medicine could cure her ailment. So, she spent ten years visiting and studying populations that report having little to no back pain. She noticed that while …

  • Payment Reform and Occupational Therapy: Why Learning ICD-10 is Good for OTs Image

    articleApr 28, 2016 | 7 min. read

    Payment Reform and Occupational Therapy: Why Learning ICD-10 is Good for OTs

    As Occupational Therapy Month comes to a close, it’s a good time to consider all of the pending changes in health care and how they will affect our field. Soon, healthcare providers will be reimbursed for their services in very different ways: new payment models will be driven by data demonstrating effective care, and ICD-10 codes—which serve as one method for gathering such quality data—will be scrutinized to determine what types of people are consuming health care …

  • Final Thoughts from CSM: Outcomes, Payment Reform, and—Purple Cows? Image

    articleFeb 9, 2015 | 19 min. read

    Final Thoughts from CSM: Outcomes, Payment Reform, and—Purple Cows?

    By Saturday morning, attendees of the APTA’s Combined Sections Meeting (CSM) were moving with a little less pep in their step—and a couple extra shots of espresso in their morning coffee. Still, the educational sessions on the final day of CSM were chock full of eager learners looking to eat up a few more morsels of wisdom before catching their planes home from Indy. Here are some highlights from day three’s informational smorgasbord (check out recaps from …

  • This Week in PT News, May 1 Image

    articleMay 1, 2015 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, May 1

    New Study Questions Safety of Whole-Body Vibration Platforms Western University just released a study showing that whole-body vibration platforms—which are typically used to treat various musculoskeletal disorders—may cause damage to joint tissues. Researchers noted significant damage to subjects’ knee joints and spines after four weeks of undergoing whole-body vibration. While study leaders say there’s still a need for additional research on the subject, they advise that all rehabilitation practitioners take extreme caution when prescribing whole-body vibration. Study: …

  • Data and Lobstah: What You Missed at APTA NEXT 2017 Image

    articleJun 27, 2017 | 5 min. read

    Data and Lobstah: What You Missed at APTA NEXT 2017

    Last week, Boston was brimming with more than hot lobstah—er, lobster—rich history, and die-hard sports fans. That’s because thousands of forward-thinking physical therapists joined together to learn, network, and discuss the future of the industry at APTA NEXT . Now, if you didn’t have a chance to attend this wicked-sweet, innovation-focused, four-day event, don’t worry. I had the opportunity to sit in on sessions, try a lobster roll for the first time, and boil down (no pun …

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