Arthroscopic Knee Surgery Shows No Long-term Benefit

Every year in the US alone, surgeons perform more than 700,000 knee arthroscopies—a procedure meant to relieve pain associated with a meniscal tear. However, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published online in the BMJ (formerly the British Medical Journal), this common surgery could be causing far more harm than good. Based on their analysis, researchers concluded that discontinuing arthroscopic surgery could prevent deep vein thrombosis and save numerous lives. To learn more about this study—and why patients should #GetPT instead—click here.

Triumph in the Triple-Aim Game: The Healthcare Executive’s Guide to Readmission Reduction, Patient Safety Promotion, and ACO Success - Regular BannerTriumph in the Triple-Aim Game: The Healthcare Executive’s Guide to Readmission Reduction, Patient Safety Promotion, and ACO Success - Small Banner

PT and Talking Therapy May Reduce Low Back Pain Side Effects

New research indicates that a combination of physical therapy and contextual cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT) may hold promise for patients who experience physical and psychological effects related to low back pain. The patients in this study experienced better outcomes when they participated in both types of rehabilitation, rather than one or the other. Physical therapy is a well-established, viable treatment option for back pain, but adding contextual cognitive behavioral therapy (CCBT), or “talking therapy,” to treatment plans allows patients to talk through—and sometimes even accept—their pain. Researchers noted that conducting a larger study would help determine if using the two treatments together might also reduce long-term treatment costs.


To stay up to date on the latest PT, OT, and SLP news, follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook.

  • This Week in PT News, November 21 Image

    articleNov 21, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, November 21

    Staring at Your Smartphone May Lead to Spine Problems It’s no secret that tilting your head to stare at your phone isn’t good for your spine, but according to researchers from the New York Spine Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, that second look at your selfie adds an extra 60 pounds of pressure on your cervical spine. That pressure can lead to poor posture as well as a host of other problems, including chronic neck and back pain. …

  • This Week in PT News, August 8 Image

    articleAug 8, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, August 8

    UnitedHealthcare Delays Requirement for Functional Limitation Reporting UnitedHealthcare announced on Monday that it is delaying its plan to implement functional limitation reporting (FLR) for physical therapy. In May, UnitedHealthcare announced that it would require FLR starting in August 2014. Since announcing the delay, the carrier has not released a new implementation date. Read more about the delay here . Physical Therapy and Corticosteroid Injections Offer Equal Relief from Shoulder Pain According to an article published in the …

  • This Week in PT News, October 31 Image

    articleOct 31, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, October 31

    Improved Cognitive Function not Dependent on Exercise Type A new study published in AGE (the official journal of the American Aging Association) revealed that all physical activity—regardless of the type of exercise—improves cognitive function. This research is a breakthrough in the PT and OT world, as many people assume they will only benefit from strength training or aerobic exercise. “I would like seniors to remember that they have the power to improve their physical and cognitive health …

  • This Week in PT News, April 4 Image

    articleApr 4, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, April 4

    ICD-10 Delayed On Monday, the Senate approved HR 4302, which extends the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) fix for another year and delays mandatory ICD-10 implementation until 2015. Learn more about this legislation and how it will affect your practice here . Muscle Mass Valuable in Older Adults A new study out of UCLA shows that the more muscle mass older adults have, the less likely they are to die prematurely. This article explains why muscle mass might …

  • This Week in PT News, August 15 Image

    articleAug 15, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, August 15

    Many Adolescents Suffer from Knee Pain for Several Years It’s very common for adolescents to experience “growing pains” in their knees; however, for some adolescents this pain can last for several years, according to a new study . If the knee pain is left untreated, it eventually could develop into knee osteoarthritis, says physical therapist Michael Skovdal Rathleff, PhD, of Aarhus University. The most effective treatment to combat knee pain and prevent knee osteoarthritis is to #GetPT. …

  • This Week in PT News, November 7 Image

    articleNov 7, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, November 7

    New Research: Smokers More Prone to Chronic Back Pain Many studies have suggested a link between smoking and low back pain, but new research out of Northwestern University shows that smoking interferes with a specific circuit associated with pain. Participants involved in the study who gave up smoking for a set time period noted a significant decrease in their pain level after quitting. Read more about how quitting smoking can alleviate chronic back pain here . Vibrating …

  • This Week in PT News, October 24 Image

    articleOct 24, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, October 24

    Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Man Walk Again A paralyzed man who suffered a spinal cord injury is beginning to walk again thanks to a groundbreaking procedure: doctors transplanted the cells responsible for the sense of smell onto the man’s spinal cord. Three months after the surgery, the patient’s left thigh muscle began to grow. Eventually, with the help of his physical therapist, he started to walk with leg braces. Doctors involved with the procedure hope that in …

  • This Week in PT News, June 27 Image

    articleJun 27, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, June 27

    New Smartphone Tool Could Prevent Falls Researchers from Purdue University recently created a portable smartphone tool that could help prevent falls. The device, called SmartGait, can measure a person’s gait length and speed, which are critical components when predicting falls. The research team believes this device will help not only with preventing falls, but also with mitigating the effects of balance disorders like Parkinson’s disease. Read more about this potentially groundbreaking tool here . Bad Posture While …

  • This Week in PT News, June 5 Image

    articleJun 5, 2015 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, June 5

    Depression May Lead to Low Back Pain Multiple studies now show that patients who suffer from depression are at an increased risk of developing lower back pain. Researchers analyzed a pool of data from 19 different studies, ultimately determining that symptoms of depression increased the risk of developing low back pain by around 60%. They cited multiple factors that could account for the link, including age, biological characteristics, lifestyle, and genetics. To find out more about the …

Achieve greatness in practice with the ultimate EMR for PTs, OTs, and SLPs.