New Study Reveals Why Some Indigenous Cultures Don’t Experience Back Pain

According to NPR, California acupuncturist Esther Gokhale recently conducted an investigation into the factors that might explain why some indigenous cultures don’t experience low back pain. Like 75% of Americans, Gokhale has experienced back pain, and she wasn’t convinced Western medicine could cure her ailment. So, she spent ten years visiting and studying populations that report having little to no back pain. She noticed that while most Americans have an S-shaped spine, populations that didn’t experience back pain had spines shaped more like a J. Based on that insight, Gokhale began a training regimen to increase her core strength and move her spine into a J shape. Eventually, her back pain vanished. Luckily, most people don’t have to travel the world to discover the secret to alleviating back pain. Instead, they can work with a physical therapist to help build up the necessary core strength. To find more about Gokhale’s discovery, click here.

Stalled Out: 5 Reasons Your Patients Are not Progressing (and What to Do About Them) - Regular BannerStalled Out: 5 Reasons Your Patients Are not Progressing (and What to Do About Them) - Small Banner

Lawmakers Propose ICD-10 Transitional Grace Period

In the third legislative attempt in a little more than a month to change the terms of the ICD-10 switch, Rep. Gary Palmer (R-Ala.) proposed HR 2652. This bill would do away with the hard switch—currently set for October 1, 2015—and instead allow practitioners a two-year “grace period,” during which they would not be "penalized for errors, mistakes and malfunctions relation to the transition to such a code set." According to Palmer, the transition to ICD-10 "threatens to hurt productivity, increase mistakes either from human or technological errors, and create confusion and difficulties as a result." While Palmer isn’t the only one concerned about the transition, physical therapists should be feeling cool, calm, and collected about the switch. Why? Because PTs have access to multiple resources to ensure a smooth transition.


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  • This Week in PT News, June 26 Image

    articleJun 26, 2015 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, June 26

    Prevent Interruptions in Physical Therapy Act Passes Senate Committee The US Senate Finance Committee has approved the Prevent Interruptions in Physical Therapy Act (S. 313), a piece of legislation proposing extended "locum tenens" provisions for physical therapists in rural and underserved areas. According to  this PT in Motion article , the bill would “allow a PT to bring in another licensed physical therapist to treat Medicare patients and bill Medicare through the practice provider number during temporary …

  • This Week in PT News, April 4 Image

    articleApr 4, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, April 4

    ICD-10 Delayed On Monday, the Senate approved HR 4302, which extends the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) fix for another year and delays mandatory ICD-10 implementation until 2015. Learn more about this legislation and how it will affect your practice here . Muscle Mass Valuable in Older Adults A new study out of UCLA shows that the more muscle mass older adults have, the less likely they are to die prematurely. This article explains why muscle mass might …

  • This Week in PT News, May 2 Image

    articleMay 1, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, May 2

    CMS Hints at ICD-10 Transition Date Last night, during the release of 2015 IPPS Proposed Rule , CMS referenced October 1, 2015, as the new implementation date for ICD-10. In fact, according to the AAPC , CMS referenced that date three separate times within the proposed rule. Not prepared for the transition? Well, we have you covered. You can reference our previous blog posts about ICD-10 here or you can head over to our ICD-10 blog . …

  • This Week in PT News, July 18 Image

    articleJul 18, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, July 18

    CMS Releases Proposed 2015 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Earlier this week, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released the proposed Medicare physician fee schedule for 2015. You can read highlights of the proposed rule and access a link to view the full version here . CMS will accept public comments on the rule until September 2, 2014, and the organization is expected to release the final fee schedule on or before November 1, 2014. ACL …

  • What the New HCAHPS Proposal Means for the Future of Hospital-Based PT  Image

    articleAug 11, 2016 | 3 min. read

    What the New HCAHPS Proposal Means for the Future of Hospital-Based PT

    When a patient is in pain, that patient wants relief—fast. And even if the patient knows medication is only a temporary fix—and a potentially dangerous one, at that—he or she will probably still choose drugs over longer-lasting, less-instant treatment options like physical therapy. For healthcare providers beholden to payment structures that incentivize patient satisfaction, that preference presents a real pickle: give the patient what he or she wants—long-term consequences be damned—or risk lower satisfaction scores (and potentially …

  • Top Regulatory Changes of 2014 Image

    articleDec 22, 2014 | 3 min. read

    Top Regulatory Changes of 2014

    Ch-ch-ch-changes : We’ve seen a plethora of regulatory changes this year in the PT space—from the ICD-10 delay to the therapy cap increase. Although some of these legislative twists and turns have caused headaches for therapists, others have been hugely positive. For instance, some form of direct access is now available in all 50 states as well as Washington, DC, and the US Virgin Islands. Read on to learn this year’s top regulatory changes. Regulatory Heavy-Hitters of …

  • Founder Letter: The Con Ed Conundrum: What's Wrong with PT CEUs Image

    articleNov 6, 2017 | 7 min. read

    Founder Letter: The Con Ed Conundrum: What's Wrong with PT CEUs

    Change is uncomfortable—however necessary it may be. And that uneasiness prevents many individuals and groups from seeking the kind of change that is vital to growth. This trend of paralysis is all too common in the physical therapy space, and in my mind, one glaring example of something desperately ripe for change is our lack of standardization—in terms of brand perception, patient experience, and clinical outcomes. And one way we can begin bridging that gap is to …

  • A Farewell Ode to ICD-9 Image

    articleSep 30, 2015 | 2 min. read

    A Farewell Ode to ICD-9

    As the hours count down It’s hard to believe That we’ve finally made it To ICD-10 Eve Our journey to get here Hasn’t been without strife As the US has clung To ICD-9 for dear life Letting go can be hard And change can be tough But in the modern medical world ICD-9 just isn’t enough Unlike a fine wine That gets better with time ICD-9 has aged poorly— It’s way past its prime Sure, we’ll always …

  • This Week in PT News, August 8 Image

    articleAug 8, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, August 8

    UnitedHealthcare Delays Requirement for Functional Limitation Reporting UnitedHealthcare announced on Monday that it is delaying its plan to implement functional limitation reporting (FLR) for physical therapy. In May, UnitedHealthcare announced that it would require FLR starting in August 2014. Since announcing the delay, the carrier has not released a new implementation date. Read more about the delay here . Physical Therapy and Corticosteroid Injections Offer Equal Relief from Shoulder Pain According to an article published in the …

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