There’s no denying that functional limitation reporting is a little more work to get the same (or less if you consider MPPR) reimbursement and that ignites fear among some in our industry. But you shouldn’t be fearful; you should be frustrated at our own inability to document to a standard that shows our clinical relevance and the amazing outcomes we achieve every day in clinics across the US. We haven’t effectively demonstrated evidence-based practice yet, nor have we properly articulated progress through functional gain. Medicare has been warning us that something like this was coming, and we never ponied up. Now, we have functional limitation reporting (FLR).

I believe we’re moving toward a pay-for-performance structure. FLR is the initial facilitation of that with Medicare patients, and it’s only a matter of time before other carriers follow suit. Essentially, resistance is futile. But why resist? That’s my point in this month’s founder letter: do not resist; do not be afraid; and do not let frustration get the best of you. Because FLR is actually good. How? This reporting affords us the opportunity to demonstrate our expertise and relevancy—and get paid for it. You are essentially already completing these things every day in your clinical practice—now you just have to document it. So get fired up. We need to prove ourselves, and prove ourselves we will. Let’s tell Medicare to bring it on!

With that said, FLR is not about crosswalking a score for an objective measure to a category of severity—in fact, doing so would defeat the purpose of FLR. In reality, FLR is about using your clinical expertise to determine limitation and severity. It’s about your clinical judgment. How many times do you give a patient a self-evaluative outcome measurement tool to complete and the results leave you wondering how he or she came to those conclusions? It’s clear that the patient has an entirely false sense of self, and you know it. FLR requires that you incorporate your clinical judgment to truly assess the severity of a patient’s functional limitation as well as his or her progress. Ultimately, you shouldn't rely solely on a patient’s’ potentially faulty self-assessment as you develop your plan of care. Instead, you should apply your expertise to provide better, more objective treatment.

I cannot stress it enough: you’re proving your worth and getting paid for it. So, stop getting bogged down on modifiers, codes, and progress notes. Really, once you “get it,” FLR becomes second nature in your documentation workflow. (Plus, this month WebPT will launch a fully-integrated FLR feature, so it’ll be super streamlined.) You’re simply telling the story in a way that validates your services.

With FLR, we finally have an outlet to prove that what we do clinically is relevant and deserves payment. We should all view these new requirements as an opportunity for us to finally demonstrate the value of our profession. We’re badasses; we know this. Now let’s show it.   

Triumph in the Triple-Aim Game: The Healthcare Executive’s Guide to Readmission Reduction, Patient Safety Promotion, and ACO Success - Regular BannerTriumph in the Triple-Aim Game: The Healthcare Executive’s Guide to Readmission Reduction, Patient Safety Promotion, and ACO Success - Small Banner
  • How to Complete Functional Limitation Reporting in WebPT Image

    articleFeb 19, 2014 | 4 min. read

    How to Complete Functional Limitation Reporting in WebPT

    As of July 1, 2013, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) requires that therapists complete functional limitation reporting (FLR)—through the use of  G-codes and severity modifiers —on all eligible Medicare Part B patients at the initial evaluation, re-evaluation if applicable, every progress note (minimum of every ten visits), and discharge in order to receive reimbursement for their services. Today, several other private insurance companies also require FLR data as a condition of reimbursement. Good thing …

  • Most Frequently Asked Questions From Our Functional Limitation Reporting Webinars Image

    articleMay 22, 2013 | 12 min. read

    Most Frequently Asked Questions From Our Functional Limitation Reporting Webinars

    Today's blog post comes from WebPT Senior Writer Charlotte Bohnett, contributing writer Erica Cohen, and WebPT Co-Founder Heidi Jannenga, PT. Monday and Tuesday we hosted webinars on functional limitation reporting. We got tons of great questions. Here are the most frequently asked ones: The Basics What is functional limitation reporting? Beginning July 1, 2013, CMS is requiring that you complete functional limitation reporting (FLR) on all Medicare part B patients in order to receive reimbursement for your …

  • articleNov 7, 2013 | 2 min. read

    FLR and PQRS: How Are They Different?

    Functional limitation reporting (FLR) and PQRS both fall under the ever-widening umbrella of Medicare regulations, and they both involve outcome measures and data codes. Still, they are completely separate requirements, each with its own set of rules. Confusing, we know. To help you sort out the differences, we’ve put together a short breakdown of each one as well as a detailed compare/contrast chart: The Basics of FLR On July 1, 2013, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services …

  • articleJul 3, 2013 | 5 min. read

    Most Frequently Asked Questions From June’s FLR Webinar

    Last month, WebPT hosted another fantastic functional limitation reporting (FLR) webinar . If you missed it or simply want a refresher, this post is for you. Here were the most frequently asked questions and answers: Q: How do I handle functional limitation reporting after July 1 for a current patient with no FLR data on record? A: If you haven't submitted functional limitation reporting data on a patient prior to July 1, you should submit it (current …

  • articleNov 5, 2013 | 3 min. read

    Founder Letter: PQRS 2014

    Well, it’s November already, and that means two things: Thanksgiving and Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS). Sure, PQRS doesn’t involve mouthwatering roasted turkey, savory stuffing, or creamy mashed potatoes, but it has become quite the November tradition for us here at WebPT. You see, this is the time of year that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) typically confirms the details of next year’s reporting requirements, thus allowing us to update our PQRS solution (claims- …

  • articleMay 8, 2013 | 3 min. read

    Why WebPT for Occupational Therapists

    We believe in empowering the entire rehab community to achieve greatness in therapy practice. That’s why we created WebPT, an intuitive, web-based EMR solution exclusively for rehab therapists that offers comprehensive documentation, scheduling, practice management, and billing services. Don’t let the name fool you; WebPT isn’t solely for physical therapists. Rather, it’s for the entire rehab therapy community, and we’ve custom tailored our EMR solution to suit the practice of occupational therapy. Here’s how: OT-Specific Documentation WebPT …

  • Monitoring Your Clinic’s Medicare Compliance Within WebPT Image

    articleFeb 13, 2014 | 4 min. read

    Monitoring Your Clinic’s Medicare Compliance Within WebPT

    It appears we have a theme going this week. Brooke devoted  Monday  and  Tuesday  to discussing WebPT’s business reports. Yesterday, I showed you  the ins and outs of the Plan of Care Report . But monitoring your Medicare compliance doesn’t end there. Here are a few more helpful reports: Medicare Payment Adjustment Report (MPAR) The Medicare Payment Adjustment Report (MPAR) shows you how multiple procedure payment reductions (MPPR) are affecting your clinic’s profits and losses. Most practice …

  • articleFeb 4, 2014 | 3 min. read

    February Founder Letter: WebPT is So Much More

    We’ve been in business for six years now, and most people know us for our documentation. As Members, you use our documentation platform daily. But did you know that your Membership with WebPT includes so much more than documentation? We’ve adopted a mission of empowering rehab therapists to achieve greatness in practice. So, while we might have started out as a documentation company, we have evolved into a solutions company. So, to take a page from Aladdin, …

  • Functional Limitation Reporting Refresher Image

    articleDec 12, 2016 | 4 min. read

    Functional Limitation Reporting Refresher

    The rehab therapy industry is abuzz with PQRS talk right now. In case you missed it: PQRS as it exists today is dunzo . In 2017, it’ll be replaced with the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System , or MIPS. Unfortunately, though—and yes, it is unfortunate —PTs, OTs, and SLPs are not required to complete MIPS reporting until 2019. (And the jury is still out as to whether they’ll be able to voluntarily participate before then.) All outpatient rehab …

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