• This Week in PT News, January 23 Image

    articleJan 23, 2015 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, January 23

    Too Much Sitting Can Be Deadly, Even With Exercise Canadian researchers have found that exercise cannot undo the negative health effects associated with prolonged sitting. According to the study, a sedentary lifestyle leads to a higher risk of heart attacks, cancer, diabetes, and death. Click here to read the full study and to find out what you can do to offset the negative effects of sitting all day. Knee Pain During Stair Use May be Early Sign …

  • This Week in PT News, January 16 Image

    articleJan 16, 2015 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, January 16

    Preventing Falls may be as Easy as Playing Catch Two studies out of the University of Illinois indicate that playing catch with a weighted medicine ball can help seniors improve balance and avoid falls. According to the studies, certain exercises can improve the anticipatory postural control lost during the aging process. Find out more about these studies and why exercise is critical to fall prevention here . Physical Therapist Ranks Sixth on Best Jobs of 2015 List …

  • This Week in PT News, January 9 Image

    articleJan 9, 2015 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, January 9

    Study: Young Concussion Patients Should Limit Rest A randomized trial published in Pediatrics shows that extended periods of rest for young adults with concussions may not be as beneficial as previously thought. The study found that participants aged 11 to 22 who suffered a concussion experienced more symptoms after five days of bed rest than those who only rested for one or two days. Researchers are still trying to pinpoint the optimal amount of rest for young …

  • This Week in PT News, January 2 Image

    articleJan 2, 2015 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, January 2

    New Research Shows Exercise Could Have a Protective Effect A new study published in a Northern Arizona University news release claims that even one exercise session may help the body overcome stressors by boosting the antioxidant system. Researchers hope this study—paired with ongoing research—will help them identify the point in cellular processes at which age-related change happens. To find out more about this study, click here . Despite Slip in Sales, Outlook for Rehab Providers Remains Positive …

  • This Week in PT News, Dec 19 Image

    articleDec 19, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, Dec 19

    Physical Therapy Cracks List of Best Healthcare Jobs According to new data, physical therapist is one of the best jobs in healthcare for 2015. The PT profession is no stranger to this list, as it’s expected to grow 36% by 2022. To see a full list of the best jobs in healthcare for 2015, click here . Employee-Shaped Medical Systems Lead to Better Care A new article in the Los Angeles Times reveals employee-shaped medical systems may …

  • This Week in PT News, December 12 Image

    articleDec 12, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, December 12

    Common Knee Surgery May Increase Arthritis Risk A new study suggests a link between a common knee surgery and arthritis. Researchers found that all of the participants who had surgery to repair meniscal tears developed arthritis within one year. The study’s author—Dr. Frank Roemer—suggests meniscal surgery can cause more harm than good when it comes to the long-term health of the joint. As an alternative to surgery, patients should #GetPT to strengthen the knee and improve joint …

  • This Week in PT News, December 5 Image

    articleDec 5, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, December 5

    Study: Exercise Helps PTSD Recovery A new study published in Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica reveals that structured exercise reduces depressive symptoms and has a positive effect on those who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Researchers hope this new information will change the course of treatment for people with PTSD to include an exercise program. Find out more about the study here . Football Linked to Brain Changes, Even Without Concussion New research suggests that even non-concussive hits …

  • This Week in PT News, November 21 Image

    articleNov 21, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, November 21

    Staring at Your Smartphone May Lead to Spine Problems It’s no secret that tilting your head to stare at your phone isn’t good for your spine, but according to researchers from the New York Spine Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine, that second look at your selfie adds an extra 60 pounds of pressure on your cervical spine. That pressure can lead to poor posture as well as a host of other problems, including chronic neck and back pain. …

  • This Week in PT News, November 14 Image

    articleNov 14, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, November 14

    Low Birth Weight Tied to Hip Replacement in Adulthood According to a new study, infants born prematurely or with low birth weight may have a higher risk of needing hip replacements due to osteoarthritis in adulthood. After accounting for other factors––like height and age––researchers found that low birth weight increased the risk by 250%. Doctors believe this is because low birth weight may result in abnormal hip development. Find out more about this study here . Falls …

  • This Week in PT News, November 7 Image

    articleNov 7, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, November 7

    New Research: Smokers More Prone to Chronic Back Pain Many studies have suggested a link between smoking and low back pain, but new research out of Northwestern University shows that smoking interferes with a specific circuit associated with pain. Participants involved in the study who gave up smoking for a set time period noted a significant decrease in their pain level after quitting. Read more about how quitting smoking can alleviate chronic back pain here . Vibrating …

  • This Week in PT News, October 31 Image

    articleOct 31, 2014 | 2 min. read

    This Week in PT News, October 31

    Improved Cognitive Function not Dependent on Exercise Type A new study published in AGE (the official journal of the American Aging Association) revealed that all physical activity—regardless of the type of exercise—improves cognitive function. This research is a breakthrough in the PT and OT world, as many people assume they will only benefit from strength training or aerobic exercise. “I would like seniors to remember that they have the power to improve their physical and cognitive health …

  • This Week in PT News, October 24 Image

    articleOct 24, 2014 | 1 min. read

    This Week in PT News, October 24

    Nose Cells Help Paralyzed Man Walk Again A paralyzed man who suffered a spinal cord injury is beginning to walk again thanks to a groundbreaking procedure: doctors transplanted the cells responsible for the sense of smell onto the man’s spinal cord. Three months after the surgery, the patient’s left thigh muscle began to grow. Eventually, with the help of his physical therapist, he started to walk with leg braces. Doctors involved with the procedure hope that in …

Pages

Get exclusive content delivered right to your inbox.