• Direct Access Laws by State (Rhode Island-Wyoming) Image

    articleOct 23, 2014

    Direct Access Laws by State (Rhode Island-Wyoming)

    You made it. Even I made it—and alive to boot! This will be my last post on direct access laws for all 50 states—plus DC and the US Virgin Islands. If you missed the previous states, please check out my last three posts: Alabama-Hawaii , Idaho-Mississippi , and Missouri-Pennsylvania . And one more disclaimer for good measure: I am not a legal expert, and I’ve sourced all of the following information from the APTA and various state …

  • Direct Access Laws by State (Missouri-Pennsylvania) Image

    articleOct 22, 2014

    Direct Access Laws by State (Missouri-Pennsylvania)

    Welcome to day three of covering direct access at the state level. If you have missed states Alabama through Mississippi, be sure to check out my last two blog posts ( Alabama-Hawaii and Idaho-Mississippi ). I would like to point out, again, that I am not a legal expert, and I’ve sourced all of the following information from the APTA and various state association websites. If you have any questions about your state’s law, please consult your …

  • Direct Access Laws by State (Idaho-Mississippi) Image

    articleOct 21, 2014

    Direct Access Laws by State (Idaho-Mississippi)

    Yesterday, we covered direct access regulations from Alabama to Hawaii . Now is a good time to mention again: I am not a legal expert, and I’ve sourced all of the following information from the APTA and various state association websites. If you have any questions about your state’s law, please consult your state’s practice act, a PT compliance expert, or your attorney. Today, we’ve made it all the way to regulations in Idaho. Po-tay-toe, po-tah-toe? Not …

  • Direct Access Laws by State (Alabama-Hawaii) Image

    articleOct 20, 2014

    Direct Access Laws by State (Alabama-Hawaii)

    This month’s blog posts are all about direct access. Fifty states—plus Washington, DC, and the US Virgin Islands—allow some form of physical therapy without a physician referral. However, the regulations vary from state to state. So, I’m going to break it all down—from AL to WY—in the next four blog posts. Before we dive into the regulations for every state, I want to mention that I am not a legal expert, and I’ve sourced all of the …

  • Direct Access: What are the Risks? Image

    articleOct 9, 2014

    Direct Access: What are the Risks?

    All states have amended their PT practice acts to allow for providing some form of PT services under direct access—or, put more simply, treating without a physician referral. But with this right comes added risks. It’s important to understand some of the potential risks and, hopefully, avoid them as much as possible. With that in mind, here are some main points to consider. 1.) Each state has its own rules governing direct access; therefore, it’s important to …

  • Medicare and Direct Access Image

    articleOct 8, 2014

    Medicare and Direct Access

    As of 2005, per the Medicare Benefit Policy Manual (Publication 100-02), Medicare beneficiaries may seek physical therapy services without seeing a physician or obtaining a referral. Sounds pretty straightforward, right? Well, we know it wouldn’t be Medicare if it was truly that straightforward. Here’s how the plot thickens: According to the APTA , “a patient must be ‘under the care of a physician, ’ which is indicated by the physician certification of the plan of care.” Confused? …

  • Social Media, HIPAA, and You Image

    articleSep 11, 2014

    Social Media, HIPAA, and You

    At this point, who doesn’t use some form of social media?  I’m not very technologically savvy, but even I have social media accounts—they’re great for staying in touch with my family on the west coast. Of course, when it comes to how I use my personal account, I still must use discretion regarding what I post. For example, I have a Labrador retriever. We brought her to the beach with us for vacation, and she loves to …

  • This Week in PT News, August 8 Image

    articleAug 8, 2014

    This Week in PT News, August 8

    UnitedHealthcare Delays Requirement for Functional Limitation Reporting UnitedHealthcare announced on Monday that it is delaying its plan to implement functional limitation reporting (FLR) for physical therapy. In May, UnitedHealthcare announced that it would require FLR starting in August 2014. Since announcing the delay, the carrier has not released a new implementation date. Read more about the delay here . Physical Therapy and Corticosteroid Injections Offer Equal Relief from Shoulder Pain According to an article published in the …

  • Common Questions from our G-Code Denials Webinar: Part 2 Image

    articleJul 30, 2014

    Common Questions from our G-Code Denials Webinar: Part 2

    Today’s blog post comes from WebPT writers Brooke Andrus and Erica Cohen. I heard that some private insurance carriers are now requiring functional limitation reporting. Is this true? Some non-Medicare insurers do require functional limitation reporting (e.g., Texas Workers' Compensation). Check out this blog post to see a list of the ones we know about right now. Keep in mind, however, that this list is ever-changing—so if you’re unsure of whether a particular plan requires FLR, be …

  • Common Questions from our G-Code Denials Webinar: Part 1 Image

    articleJul 29, 2014

    Common Questions from our G-Code Denials Webinar: Part 1

    Today’s blog post comes from WebPT writers Brooke Andrus and Erica Cohen. If a patient has more than one functional limitation associated with a single diagnosis, should I report G-codes and severity modifiers for all of them? No. Medicare will only accept functional limitation reporting (FLR) data for one primary functional limitation per case. Therefore, if the patient has multiple functional limitations associated with a single diagnosis, you'll need to determine which one represents the patient's primary …

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